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United States' M5 High Speed Tractor

Design

Work began in 1941 on the T21 prototype that was to become the M5 High Speed Tractor.1 They were designed to tow and carry the crew of 105 mm and 155 mm howitzers.1

There was a winch and roller that could pull vehicles from the front or from the rear.1

Production

  • M5 High Speed Tractor:
    • Manufacturer: International Harvester1
    • Production: 1942 - ?1

Usage

After World War II

Austria, Japan, Pakistan, and Yugoslavia used the M5 High Speed Tractor after World War II.1

Specifications

  M5 High Speed Tractor
Crew 1 + 101
Physical Characteristics  
Weight 30,340 lb1
13,791 kg1
Length 16' 6"1
5.03 m1
Height 8' 10"1
2.69 m1
Width 8' 4"1
2.54 m1
Width over tracks  
Ground clearance  
Ground contact length  
Ground pressure  
Armament  
Main - anti-aircraft 1: 12.7 mm Browning MG1
Quantity  
Main  
Armor Thickness (mm)  
Hull Front, Upper  
Hull Front, Lower  
Hull Sides, Upper  
Hull Sides, Lower  
Hull Rear  
Hull Top  
Hull Bottom  
Engine (Make / Model) Continental R65721
Bore / stroke  
Cooling  
Cylinders 61
Capacity  
Net HP 2071
Power to weight ratio  
Compression ratio  
Transmission (Type)  
Steering  
Steering ratio  
Starter  
Electrical system  
Ignition  
Fuel (Type) Gasoline1
Octane  
Quantity  
Road consumption  
Cross country consumption  
Performance  
Speed - Road 30 mph1
48 kph1
Speed - Cross Country  
Range - Road 150 miles1
241 km1
Range - Cross Country  
Turning radius  
Elevation limits  
Fording depth 4' 4"1
1.3 m1
Trench crossing 5' 6"1
1.7 m1
Vertical obstacle 2' 3"1
0.7 m1
Climbing ability  
Suspension (Type)  
Wheels each side  
Return rollers each side  
Tracks (Type)  
Length  
Width  
Diameter  
Number of links  
Pitch  
Tire tread  
Track centers/tread  

Sources:

  1. Armored Fighting Vehicles, 300 of the World's Greatest Military Vehicles, Philip Trewhitt, 1999
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site