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United States' M29 Studebaker Weasel cargo carrier

Design

A plan was devised in 1943 to invade Norway and a cargo carrier that could travel over snow would be needed.1

There was a towing pindle that could be used to tow artillery.1

The M29 had a very low ground pressure and was sometimes used to cross fields with anti-tank mines as it wouldn't set them off.1

Amphibious

At the front and rear were flotation chambers.1

There were two rudders for steering in water.1

The M29C could perform well in smooth water.1

Tracks

The tracks were flexible to allow for propulsion through water.1

Production

  • M29C Weasel: ~8,0001

At the end of the war order for a further 10,000 were cancelled.1

Variants

  • T19 Weasel: Tracked cargo carrier.1
  • T24 Weasel: Could travel over snow and through mud.1
  • M29 Cargo Carrier: Standardized T24.1 Could only travel on land.1
  • M29C Weasel: Amphibious cargo carrier based on the M29.1 Also named Ark.1
  • M29C Type A: Center mounted 75 mm recoilless rifle on Weasel.3
  • M29C Type B: Rear mounted 75 mm recoilless rifle on Weasel.3
  • M29C Type C: Center mounted 37 mm gun on Weasel.3

Usage

The M29s and M29Cs were occasionally used as ambulances.1

Weasels were found to be very mechanically reliable and the tracks last much longer than anticipated.1

Signal units used the M29Cs as very affective wire layers as it could go most places other vehicles couldn't.1

Specifications

  M29 Weasel
Crew  
Physical Characteristics  
Weight - Loaded 2.4 tons2
Weight - Unloaded 1.8 tons2
Cargo 0.5 tons2
Length 11' 1"2
Length over hull  
Height 5' 11"2
Width 5' 7"2
Width over tracks  
Ground clearance 11"2
Ground contact length  
Ground pressure  
Turret ring diameter  
Armament  
MG  
Side arms  
Quantity  
MG  
Side arms  
Armor Thickness (mm)  
Hull Front, Upper  
Hull Front, Lower  
Hull Sides, Upper  
Hull Sides, Lower  
Hull Rear  
Hull Top  
Hull Bottom  
Turret Front  
Turret Sides  
Turret Rear  
Turret Top  
Engine (Make / Model) Studebaker G1702
Bore / stroke 3" / 4"2
Cooling  
Cylinders 62
Capacity  
Net HP 75 @ 3,600 rpm2
Power to weight ratio  
Compression ratio  
Transmission (Type)  
Steering  
Steering ratio  
Starter  
Electrical system 12 volt2
Ignition Battery2
Fuel (Type) Gasoline2
Octane  
Quantity 29 gallons2
Road consumption 7 mpg2
Cross country consumption  
Performance  
Traverse  
Speed - Road 28 mph2
Speed - Water  
Range - Road 199 miles2
Range - Water  
Turning radius 12'2
Elevation limits  
Fording depth  
Trench crossing  
Vertical obstacle  
Climbing ability  
Suspension (Type)  
Wheels each side  
Return rollers each side  
Tracks (Type)  
Length  
Width  
Diameter  
Number of links  
Pitch  
Tire tread  
Track centers/tread 6' 6"2
  M29C Weasel
Crew 1 + 31
Physical Characteristics  
Weight - Loaded 6,040 lb1
2,740 kg1
Weight - Unloaded 4,840 lb1
2,195 kg1
Cargo 860 lb1
390 kg1
Length 15' 8.75"1
4.794 m1
Length over hull 14' 5.5"1
4.4 m1
Height 5' 10.75"1
1.797 m1
Width 5' 7"1
1.7 m1
Width over tracks  
Ground clearance  
Ground contact length  
Ground pressure  
Turret ring diameter  
Armament  
MG  
Side arms  
Quantity  
MG  
Side arms  
Armor Thickness (mm)  
Hull Front, Upper  
Hull Front, Lower  
Hull Sides, Upper  
Hull Sides, Lower  
Hull Rear  
Hull Top  
Hull Bottom  
Turret Front  
Turret Sides  
Turret Rear  
Turret Top  
Engine (Make / Model) Studebaker Model 6-1701
Bore / stroke  
Cooling  
Cylinders  
Capacity  
Net HP 751
Power to weight ratio  
Compression ratio  
Transmission (Type)  
Steering  
Steering ratio  
Starter  
Electrical system  
Ignition  
Fuel (Type) Gasoline1
Octane  
Quantity  
Road consumption  
Cross country consumption  
Performance  
Traverse  
Speed - Road 25 mph2, 36.4 mph1
58.58 kph1
Speed - Water 4 mph1,2
6.4 kph1
Range - Road  
Range - Water  
Turning radius  
Elevation limits  
Fording depth  
Trench crossing  
Vertical obstacle  
Climbing ability  
Suspension (Type)  
Wheels each side  
Return rollers each side  
Tracks (Type) Rubber1
Length  
Width  
Diameter  
Number of links  
Pitch  
Tire tread  
Track centers/tread  

Sources:

  1. The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II, Chris Bishop, 1998
  2. Allied Liberation Vehicles, François Bertin, 2007
  3. Profile: AFV Weapons 26: Hellcat, Long Tom and Priest and Complete Check List of all U.S. World War II Self-Propelled Weapons, Colonel Robert J. Icks, 1971
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site