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United States' Beech UC-43 Traveler liaison

Photos

Beechcraft D17S, GB-1, YC-43 liaison:
United States' Beechcraft D17S, GB-1, YC-43 liaison
Aeronautics Aircraft Spotters' Handbook
Beechcraft D17S, GB-1, YC-43 liaison:
United States' Beechcraft D17S, GB-1, YC-43 liaison
Aeronautics Aircraft Spotters' Handbook

Design

The Model 17 was Beech's first commercial aircraft that was used as a business executive's plane.1 In 1939 the United States Army Air Corps purchased three for evaluation.1

The UC-43 had retractable landing gear.1

Production

There was an initial order of 27 planes that was increased by 207 by a second order.1

  • Manufacturer: Beech Aircraft Company1
    • Location: Wichita, Kansas1
  • Production: Late 1941 - ?1

Variants

  • Beech UC-43:
  • Beechcraft D17S:
  • Beech GB-1: Navy version.1
  • Beechcraft YC-43: Army version.2

Usage

The Beech UC-43 was primarily used in the United States, but some were sent to Europe in 1944 for use.1

Specifications

  Beech UC-43 Traveler1
Type Liaison1
Crew 11
Passengers 41
Engine (Type) Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-1 Wasp Jr.1
Cylinders Radial 91
Cooling Air1
HP 4501
Propeller blades  
Dimensions  
Span 32'1
Length 26' 2"1
Height 10' 3"1
Wing area  
Weight  
Empty  
Loaded 4,700 lb1
Performance  
Speed 198 mph1
Cruising speed  
Climb  
Service ceiling 20,000'1
Range 500 miles1
Armament None1
  Beechcraft D17S
Type Personnel transport2, Cooperation2
Crew 12
Passengers 3 - 42
Engine (Type) 1: Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior2
Cylinders Radial2
Cooling Air2
HP 4502
Propeller blades 22
Dimensions  
Span 32'2
Length 26' 10"2
Height 8'2
Wing area  
Weight  
Empty  
Loaded 4,250 lb2
Performance  
Speed  
Cruising speed  
Climb  
Service ceiling  
Range 840 miles2
Armament  

Sources:

  1. World War II Airplanes Volume 2, Enzo Angelucci, Paolo Matricardi, 1976
  2. Aeronautics Aircraft Spotters' Handbook, Ensign L. C. Guthman, 1943
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site