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Japan's Imperial Navy flag

Japan's Shinano fleet aircraft carrier

Photos

Drawing of the Shinano:
Drawing of Japan's Shinano
US Naval History and Heritage Command photograph NH 63436
Drawing of the Shinano:
Drawing of Japan's Shinano
US Naval History and Heritage Command photograph NH 63437
Shinano off Yokohama during sea trials on November 11, 1944:
Shinano off Yokohama during sea trials on November 11, 1944
Hiroshi Arakawa

Design

The Shinano was initially laid down in May 1940 to become the third Yamato class battleship. However, after the Battle of Midway it was to become an aircraft carrier. The Shinano was to be one of two Japanese carriers that would have an armored flight deck.

It was intended the Shinano would be more of a maintenance carrier that would support other carriers with stocks of bombs, torpedoes, fuel, spare parts, aircraft, and other supplies. There would be aircraft carried that would be for local defense.

Flight Deck

The flight deck had two elevators installed. There were no catapults.

Hangar

The Shinano had one divided hangar deck 550' long. In the front section there was storage for 47 aircraft. The rear section had rolling shutters on the sides that could be opened. Spare parts and spare aircraft would be carried in the rear section.

Ships

IJN Shinano (an ancient Japanese province)

  • Manufacturer: Yokosuka, Yokosuka Navy Yard
  • May 4, 1940: Laid down.
  • October 8, 1944: Launched.
  • November 18, 1944, November 19, 1944: Commissioned.
  • November 29, 1944: Sunk. USS Archerfish sunk the Shinano on her way to Matsuyama / Kure to finish fitting out.

 

Usage

Poor Damage Control

The USS Archerfish hit the Shinano with four torpedoes at 3:17 AM on November 29, 1944. Though the Shinano was still able to move the crew was inexperienced and there were workman still onboard. Watertight doors were left open and some seams were found to be poorly welded.

The Shinano filled with water and rolled over at 10:17 AM. Around 1,000 of the crew survived.

 

Specifications

  Shinano
Crew 2,400
Displacement 62,000 tons, 64,000 tons, 64,800 tons
Displacement - Loaded 70,755 tons, 71,890 tons, 71,900 tons
Physical Characteristics  
Length 872', 872' 8", 872' 9", 873'
265.8 m, 266 m
Length - Water Line 839' 11", 840'
256 m
Length - Between Perpendiculars 800' 6"
244 m
Beam 119', 119' 1", 119' 3"
36.3 m
Draft / Height 33' 9", 33' 10", 34'
10.3 m
Flight Deck 827' x 131', 839' 7" x 131' 7", 839' 11" x 131' 3", 840' x 131' 3"
252 m x 40 m, 255.9 m x 40.1 m, 256 m x 40 m
Performance  
Speed 27 knots
Range at 18 knots 10,000 nautical miles
Range 10,000 nautical miles
Armament  
Anti-Aircraft 5", 127 mm: 16
5" twin mounts, 5" L/40 twin mounts, 127 mm twin mounts: 8, 16
25 mm triple mounts: 35, 36
25 mm: 37, 40, 145
5" rockets 28 barrel: 12
Rocket launchers: 336
Aircraft 47, 120
Fighter: 18
Bomber: 18
Observation: 6
Armor  
Belt 8", 8.07", 8.1"
20.5 cm
Belt - Magazine 15.75"
Belt - Amidships 6.3"
Magazine 7", 7.48"
Barbettes 7"
Deck 7.5"
Flight Deck 2.95", 3.1", 3.15", 4"
8 cm
Hangar Deck 7.5", 7.87"
20 cm
Engines  
Boilers 12
Kampon, Kanpon: 12
Shafts 4
Turbines Geared, Geared steam , Kampon geared, Kanpon geared
HP 147,948, 150,000
Oil 8,900 tons, 8,904 tons

Sources:

  1. Japanese Warships of World War II, A. J. Watts, 1966
  2. The Imperial Japanese Navy, A. J. Watts and B. G. Gordon, 1971
  3. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922-1946, Robert Gardiner, 1987
  4. The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II, Chris Bishop, 1998
  5. Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carriers 1921-45, Mark Stille, 2005
  6. The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War, Mark E. Stille, 2013
  7. The World's Aircraft Carriers 1914 - 1945, Roger Chesneau, 1986
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site