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Japan's Imperial Navy flag

Japan's Shinyo class escort aircraft carrier

Photos

IJN Shinyo on November 1, 1943 in the Western Island Sea:
Japan's IJN Shinyo on November 1, 1943 in the Western Island Sea
Imperial War Museum

Design

The Shinyo was converted from the German passenger liner Scharnhorst which had been in Kobe harbor since 1939 since it couldn't go home. It was purchased in February 1942 by the Japanese government after the Battle of Midway.

As the IJN Chuyo had just been completed it was decided the conversion for the Shinyo should be very similar.

Borrowed Steel

The steel used in the conversion came from the abandoned fourth hull, No. 111, of the Yamato class battleships.

Updates

To increase stability bulges were added.

Flight Deck

The flight deck was flush. There were two elevators that took planes between the hangar and flight deck.

Ships

IJN Shinyo (godly hawk)

  • Formerly the Scharnhorst
  • Manufacturer: A. G. Weser at Bremen, Deschimag, Deschimag at Bremen
  • December 14, 1934, 1934: Launched.
  • 1935: Completed.
  • September 1942: Conversion began. The conversion took place at Kure Naval Dockyard.
  • December 1943, December 15, 1943: Conversion completed.
  • Early 1944: 12 25 mm guns added.
  • July 1944, Mid 1944: 8 25 mm guns added.
  • November 17, 1944, November 1944: Sunk by USS Spadefish 140 nautical miles northeast of Shanghai.

Usage

Convoy Escort

The Shinyo joined the Grand Escort Command. In November 1944 Shinyo was escorting a convoy headed to Singapore when hit by four torpedoes from the USS Spadefish. The aviation fuel tanks exploded which ended up sinking the Shinyo.

Specifications

  Shinyo
Crew 942, 948
Displacement 17,500 tons
Physical Characteristics  
Length 621' 3", 650' 6", 651'
189.35 m, 198.3 m
Length - Water Line 621' 3"
189.36 m, 189.4 m
Length - Between Perpendiculars 606' 11", 610', 625' 6"
185 m, 186 m
Beam 84', 84' 4", 84' 9"
25 m, 25.6 m
Draft / Height 25' 6", 26', 26' 9", 26' 10"
7.7 m, 8.15 m, 8.18 m
Flight Deck 590' 6" x 80', 590' 6" x 80' 4", 590' 6" x 80' 6"
168.5 m x 24.5 m
Performance  
Speed 22 knots
Range 8,000 nautical miles
Range at 18 knots 8,000 nautical miles
Armament  
Anti-Aircraft 5": 8
5" twin mounts, 5" L/40 twin mounts, 127 mm twin mounts: 4
25 mm: 30
25 mm triple mounts: 10
25 mm single mounts: 12
Aircraft 33
Armor None
Engines  
Boilers 4
Kanpon: 2
Water tube: 4
Shafts 2
Turbines AEG geared, Geared
HP 26,000

Sources:

  1. Japanese Warships of World War II, A. J. Watts, 1966
  2. The Imperial Japanese Navy, A. J. Watts and B. G. Gordon, 1971
  3. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922-1946, Robert Gardiner, 1987
  4. Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carriers 1921-45, Mark Stille, 2005
  5. Allied Escort Carriers of World War Two in Action, Kenneth Poolman, 1988
  6. The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War, Mark E. Stille, 2013
  7. The World's Aircraft Carriers 1914 - 1945, Roger Chesneau, 1986
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site