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Japan's Imperial Army flag

Japan's Kawasaki Ki-119 light bomber

Design

By early 1945 an urgent need for an easy to manufacture and maintain light bomber was needed. In March 1945 the Japanese Army Air Force ordered Kawasaki to begin design work for an aircraft that had the following requirements:

  • Range of 373 miles / 600 km
  • Bomb load of 1,764 lb / 800 kg
  • Armament of two 20 mm Ho-5 cannons
  • Powered by an Army Type 4 engine
  • Be manufactured at dispersed underground factories

By June 1945 Takeo Doi and Jun Kitano completed the basic design. Many of the features were based on the Ki-100.

Multiple Roles

The Ki-119 could also be used as a dive bomber with two 551 lb / 250 kg bombs, or as a fighter escort with two 20 mm Ho-05 cannons added in the wings.

Air Raids

Air raids in June 1945 destroyed the design drawings and had to be recreated. It was hoped to have the first prototype ready to fly in November 1945 but with the surrender of Japan all work was stopped.

Specifications

  Ki-119
Type Light bomber
Crew 1
Engine (Type) Army Type 4, Mitsubishi Ha-104
Cylinders Radial 18
Cooling Air
Net HP 2,000
Propeller blades 3 metal
Dimensions  
Span 45' 11 3/16"
14 m
Length 38' 10 17/32"
11.85 m
Height 14' 9 5/32"
4.5 m
Wing area 343.367 sq ft
31.9 sq m
Weight  
Empty 8,289 lb
3,670 kg
Loaded 13,184 lb
5,980 kg
Performance  
Speed at Sea Level 295 mph
475 kph
Speed at 19,685' / 6,000 m 360 mph
580 kph
Climb to 19,685' / 6,000 m 6 minutes 6 seconds
Service ceiling 34,450'
10,500 m
Range 373 miles
600 km
Range - Maximum 746 miles
1,200 km
Armament  
Fuselage 2: 20 mm Ho-5
Wings - Fighter Escort 2: 20 mm Ho-5
Bombs - Light Bomber 1: 1,764 lb
1: 800 kg
Bombs - Dive Bomber 2: 551 lb
2: 250 kg
OR  
Drop Tanks 2: 132 gallon
2: 600 liter

Sources:

  1. Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War, René J Francillon, 1970
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site