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Italy's Savoia-Marchetti S.M.82 medium bomber
Nick name: Canguru (kangaroo), Marsupiale (marsupial)

Photos

  • Savoia-Marchetti SM.82 Canguru bomber
  • Savoia-Marchetti SM.82 Canguru bomber
  • Savoia-Marchetti SM.82 Canguru bomber

Design

The Savoia-Marchetti S.M.82 was designed in 1938. It was initially designed to be a long range transport.

Cargo

The cargo area was was very roomy. The S.M.82's cargo area was separated by a removable metal floor. There was a runway that went across the top of the fuselage to help with loading and unloading. It could hold a dismantled C.R.42 biplane fighter.

Wing

The S.M.82's wing was made from wood.

Fuselage

The fuselage of the S.M.82 was made of steel tubing and wood with the covering of wood and fabric.

Landing Gear

The landing gear retracted into the engine nacelles.

Prototype

The S.M.82 prototype was first flown in 1938/1939.

Production

  • Total: ~400, 875
  • Manufacturer: SIAI Marchetti
  • Production: 1941 - 1943

Usage

The S.M.82 was used by Germany and Italy.

The S.M.82 was designed to be a bomber, but it was primarily used as a transport. On one occasion it crammed in 96 people.

World Records

In 1939 the S.M.82 broke the record for flying 8,000 miles and the other by flying an average 150 mph for 6,250 miles.

The S.M. 82 flew 8,037 miles in 56 hours 30 minutes with an average speed of 143 mph.

Beginning of World War II

There were twelve S.M.82s in operation at the start of World War II. There were a part of the 607a and 608a Squadriglie of the 149° Gruppo "T" located in Naples.

Luftwaffe

The Luftwaffe used about 50 S.M.82s in the Baltic region on the Eastern Front.

Post World War II

Around 50 of the S.M.82s survived World War II. Around 30 of the SM.82s joined the Allied Co-Belligerent Air Force. A few joined the Fascists.

The Aeronautica Militare Italiana used the S.M.82 into the 1950s / 1960s. These had their engines replaced with Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp radials (1,215 HP).

Specifications

  Savoia-Marchetti S.M.82 Canguru
Type Heavy bomber, Heavy transport, Transport bomber, Transport
Crew 4 - 5
Cargo 600 gallons fuel
18: 44 gallon / 200 liter fuel drums
OR 8,800 lb
OR 1: dismantled CR.42
OR 6 airplane engines
OR  
Passengers 28 paratroopers
40 troops
Engine (Type) 3: Alfa Romeo 128 RC 18
3: Alfa Romeo 128 RC 21
Cylinders RC 18: Radial 14
RC 21: Radial 9
HP RC 18: 860 each
RC 21: 950 each
Cooling Air
Propeller blades 3 each, 3 metal each
Dimensions  
Span 97' 4.5", 97' 5", 97' 6"
29.5 m, 29.68 m
Length 73' 6", 73' 10", 74' 4.25", 75' 1.5" , 75' 2"
22.5 m, 22.9 m
Height 18', 18' 2.5", 19' 8", 19' 8.25"
5.5 m, 6 m
Wing area 1,276 sq ft, 1,276.1 sq ft
118.5 sq m
Weight  
Empty 23,260 lb, 26,400 lb
10,550 kg, 12,000 kg
Loaded 38,000 lb, 39,340 lb, 39,600 lb, 39,700 lb, 39,727 lb
18,020 kg
Maximum load 44,092 lb
20,000 kg
Performance  
Speed 200 mph, 230 mph
370 kph
Speed at 8,200' / 2,500 m 205 mph
328 kph
Cruising speed 137 - 186 mph
220 - 300 kph
Climb 650' / minute
198 m / minute
Climb to 9,840' / 3,000 m 18 minutes
Service ceiling 19,685', 19,690', 20,000', 20,230'
6,000 m, 6,100 m
Range 1,864 miles, 1,865 miles, 2,480 miles, 2,484 miles
3,000 km, 3,970 km
Armament 4: MG
Dorsal turret 1: MG
1: 12.7 mm MG
Nose 1: 7.7 mm MG
Ventral 1: 7.7 mm MG
Beam positions 2: 7.7 mm MG
Bombs 8,800 lb, 8,818 lb
4,000 kg
OR  
Cargo 8,800 lb, 8,818 lb
4,000 kg

Sources:

  1. Aircraft of WWII, Stewart Wilson, 1998
  2. World War II Airplanes Volume 1, Enzo Angelucci, Paolo Matricardi, 1976
  3. Aeronautics Aircraft Spotters' Handbook, Ensign L. C. Guthman, 1943
  4. Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War II, 1989
  5. Italian Civil and Military Aircraft 1930-1945, Jonathan Thompson, 1963
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site