World War II Vehicles, Tanks and Airplanes, picture of P-51 Mustang
World War II Vehicles, Tanks and Airplanes, picture of T-34/85
World War II Vehicles, Tanks and Airplanes, picture of Fw-190
World War II Vehicles, Tanks and Airplanes, picture of Churchill
wwiivehicles.com ©2016
Search:
German Balkenkreuz

Germany's Marder II; 7.5 cm Pak 40/2 auf Slf II
Translation: Martin/Marten (weasel)

Design

With the invasion of Russia, and their tanks that were encountered, it was found that there was a need for mobile anti-tank firepower.

The Marder II was developed from the conversion of the PzKpfw II chassis. Even though the PzKpfw II was obsolete it was decided to continue production of the chassis so as to not waste the time and materials it would have taken to convert the production lines.

Fighting Compartments

The driver's compartment was located in the front, the fighting in the middle, and the engine at the rear. The fighting compartment had the top open. The main armament was put behind 10 mm armor.

Captured Soviet Guns

These were designated the 7.62 cm FK 296(r). Most of the guns were rechambered so that they could use the new anti-tank round used in the 75 mm PaK 40/2 gun. These were designated the 7.62 cm Pak 36(r).

Prototype

The initial prototype of the Panzerjäger with a PzKpfw II chassis had a 5 cm anti tank gun installed. The final production model had a 7.5 cm Pak 40/2.

Production

  • Marder II Ausf A, Ausf B and Ausf C:
    • Converted: 531
      • 1942-1943
    • Manufacturer: Alkett
  • Marder II Ausf D and Ausf E:
    • Converted: 185, 201
      • 1942, April 1942 - June 1943
    • Manufacturer: Alkertt, Wegmann
  • Marder II 7.5 cm: 576, 744, 852, 1,217, 1,983
    • Production: 1942 - ?, 1942 - 1943, 1942 - June 1943, June 1942 - June 1943, July 1942 - 1944, ? - 1944, July 1943 - March 1944
    • Converted: 75
      • July 1943 - March 1944
    • Manufacturer: FAMO, MAN, Daimler-Benz, Breslau, Böhmisch-Mährisch Kolben-Darek AG (Prague)

Variants

  • Marder II Ausf A, Ausf B, Ausf C: In mid-1942, Alkett started to convert PzKpfw II Ausf A - Ausf C tanks. They either mounted an unmodified 7.62 cm Soviet FK 296(r) field gun (without muzzle brake) or the rechambered 7.62cm Pak 36(r) (with muzzle brake).
    The gun was mounted in a single three sided armored section.
    • Also known as:
      • Panzerjäger II Ausf A-C für 7.62 cm Pak 36(r), SdKfz 131:
      • PzSfl für 7.62cm Pak 36(r), SdKfz 132, Marder II:
      • 7.62 cm Pak 36(r) L/54.8 auf Fgst, PzKpfw II (Sfl):
      • PzJaeg II Ausf D, E für 7.62 cm Pak 36(r):
      • 7.62 Pak 36(r) (Sfl im PzKpfw II):
  • Marder II Ausf D and Ausf E: In the Spring of 1942, Alkett designed a vehicle that used the PzKpfw II Ausf D and E chassis with captured Russian 76.2 mm M36 field guns.
    Used captured Russian guns. They were rechambered to hand German PaK 40 ammunition. Could penetrate 80 mm at 900 meters. Were issued to the Panzerjägerabteilungen (Sf) (tank hunter detachments) of Panzer and Panzer-Grenadier divisions from April 1942 (primarily units fighting in Russia).
    • Also known as:
      • Panzer Selbstfahrlafette I fur 7.62 cm PaK 36(r) auf Fahrgestell PzKpfw II Ausf D und E, SdKfz 132:
      • Panzerjäger II Ausf D-E fur 7.62 cm Pak 36(r), SdKfz 132:
  • Marder II 7.5cm: Could penetrate 92 mm at 900 meters. Issued to Panzerjäger detachments from July 1942. Most were sent to the Eastern Front, but did serve on all fronts. Some models were equipped with infrared searchlights.
    The 75 mm gun fired a 15 lb AP shell at a muzzle velocity of 2,461'/sec. The HE shell had a range of 8,421 yards.
    • Also known as:
      • 7.5 cm PaK40/2 auf Fahrgestell PzKpfw II (Sf), Marder II, SdKfz 131:
      • 7.5 cm PaK 40/2 auf SF1, II, "Marder II", SdKfz 131:
      • 7.5cm Pak 40/2 auf Sfl II (Marder II) SdKfz 131:
      • PzJaeg II Ausf A, C und für 7.5cm Pak 40/2 L/46:
      • GW II für 7.5cm Pak 40/2 (Marder II):

Usage

The Marder II was used in Tunisia in 1943.

Reduced Crew

The crew was often reduced by one to reduce manpower by 1944.

Infra-Red

Infra-red searchlights were sometimes installed to allow the Marder II to be used at night. These units were primarily used on the Eastern Front.

Specifications

  Panzer Selbstfahrlafette I fur 7.62 cm PaK 36(r) auf Fahrgestell PzKpfw II Ausf D und E,
Marder II, SdKfz 132
Crew 4
Radio FuG Spr d
Physical Characteristics  
Weight 10.7 tons, 11.5 tons
Length 5.65 m
Height 2.6 m
Width 2.3 m
Width over tracks  
Ground clearance  
Ground contact length  
Ground pressure  
Armament (mm)  
Main 1: 76.2 mm PaK 36 L/51.5
1: 7.62 cm FK 296
Secondary  
MG 1: 7.92 mm MG34
Side arms  
Quantity  
Main 30
Secondary  
MG 900
Side arms  
Armor Thickness (mm) 10-14.5
Hull Front, Upper 30@9°
Hull Front, Lower 30@9°
Hull Sides, Upper 14.5@20°
Hull Sides, Lower 14.5@0°
Hull Rear 14.5@15°
Hull Top open
Hull Bottom 5@90°
Superstructure Front 14.5@30°
Superstructure Sides 14.5@15°
Superstructure Rear open
Superstructure Top open
Engine (Make / Model) Maybach HL 62 TRM
Bore / stroke  
Cooling  
Cylinders 6
Capacity  
Net HP 140
Power to weight ratio  
Compression ratio  
Transmission (Type) 7 forward, 3 reverse
Steering  
Steering ratio  
Starter  
Electrical system  
Ignition  
Fuel (Type)  
Octane  
Quantity  
Road consumption  
Cross country consumption  
Performance  
Traverse 50°, hand
65°, hand
Speed - Road 34 mph
55 kph
Speed - Cross Country 136.7 mph
Range - Road 220 km
Range - Cross Country  
Turning radius  
Elevation limits -5° to +16°
-5° to +22°
Fording depth  
Trench crossing  
Vertical obstacle  
Climbing ability  
Suspension (Type)  
Wheels each side 5x2
Return rollers each side 4
Tracks (Type)  
Length  
Width  
Diameter  
Number of links  
Pitch  
Tire tread  
Track centers/tread  
  7.5cm Pak40 auf PzKpfw II,
Marder II, SdKfz 131
Crew 3 or 4, 3, 4
Radio FuG Spr d
Physical Characteristics  
Weight 24,200 lb, 24,251 lb
10.63 tons, 10.8 tons, 11.8 tons
10,800 kg, 11,000 kg
Length w/gun 20' 10.4"
6.36 m
Length w/o gun 14.9'
Height 7' 2.6"
2.2 m
Width 7.3', 7' 5.75", 7' 5.8"
2.28 m
Width over tracks  
Ground clearance 13.4"
Ground contact length 94.5"
Ground pressure 10.6 psi
Armament (mm)  
Main 1: 75 mm PaK40/2
1: 75 mm
1: 75 mm Pak 40/2, L/46
Secondary  
MG 1: 7.92 mm MG
1: 7.92 mm MG34
1: 7.92 mm MG34
OR 1: 7.92 mm MG42
Side arms  
Quantity  
Main 37
Secondary  
MG 600
Side arms  
Armor Thickness (mm) 35
Front: 0.38"
Side: 0.6"
Superstructure: 0.38"
Hull Front, Upper 30@10°
Hull Front, Lower 35@13°
Hull Sides, Upper 10@8°
Hull Sides, Lower 15@0°
Hull Rear 10@0° & open
Hull Top 10 & open
Hull Bottom 5@90°
Superstructure Front Gun Shield: 4+4@30°
Superstructure Sides  
Superstructure Rear  
Superstructure Top  
Engine (Make / Model) Maybach HL 62 TRM
Maybach HL62
Maybach HL 62 TR
Bore / stroke  
Cooling Water
Cylinders I-6
Capacity  
Net HP 140, 140@2,600 rpm
Power to weight ratio  
Compression ratio 6.5:1
Transmission (Type) Synchromesh
6 forward, 1 reverse
Steering Clutch brake
Steering ratio  
Starter Electric
Electrical system 12-volt
Ignition  
Fuel (Type) Gasoline
Octane  
Quantity 45 gallons
Road consumption 2.6 mpg
Cross country consumption 1.5 mpg
Performance  
Traverse 32° left, 24° right
Hand
65°
Speed - Road 24.8 mph, 25 mph
40 kph
Speed - Cross Country 12 mph
Range - Road 118 miles
190 km
Range - Cross Country 78 miles
Turning radius  
Elevation limits -5° to +20°, -8° to +10°
Fording depth 2' 11", 3'
0.9 m
Trench crossing 5' 11"
1.8 m
Vertical obstacle 1' 4", 1' 4.5"
0.42 m
Climbing ability 30° (57%) slope
Suspension (Type)  
Wheels each side Each road wheel is attached to an arm which is attached to a 1/4 elliptic spring which rests against a roller
Return rollers each side  
Tracks (Type) Dry pin
Length  
Width 11.8"
Diameter  
Number of links 108
Pitch 3.6"
Tire tread  
Track centers/tread 6.2'

Sources:

  1. The Encyclopedia of Tanks and Armored Fighting Vehicles - The Comprehensive Guide to Over 900 Armored Fighting Vehicles From 1915 to the Present Day, General Editor: Christopher F. Foss, 2002
  2. Encyclopedia of German Tanks of World War Two, Peter Chamberlain and Hilary Doyle, 1999
  3. The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II, Chris Bishop, 1998
  4. World Encyclopedia of Armored Fighting Vehicles, Jack Livesey, 2006
  5. German Tanks of World War II, Dr. S. Hart & Dr. R. Hart, 1998
  6. Tank Data, Aberdeen Proving Grounds Series, 1968?
  7. Profile, AFV Weapons #55, German Self-Propelled Weapons, Peter Chamberlain, H.L. Doyle, 1973
  8. Armored Fighting Vehicles, 300 of the World's Greatest Military Vehicles, Philip Trewhitt, 1999
20th Century American Military History Crucial Site